UNLOCKING PHARMACOGENOMICS: EVALUATING THE EXPERTISE AND PERSPECTIVES OF HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS IN LAHORE

Main Article Content

Syed Muhammad Ali
Afifa Tariq
Adan Ajmal
Tooba Ali
Usama Nadeem
Hira
Nabeel Nawaz
Mudasir Malik
Abdul Rafay
Muhammad Aamir
Saimon Shahzad

Keywords

KAP, Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics, Physician, Pharmacist, Lahore

Abstract

Pharmacogenomics, the study of how genes affect a person's response to drugs, reveals distinct levels of knowledge, attitudes, and practices among physicians and pharmacists. Improved patient outcomes can be achieved through enhanced knowledge, positive attitudes, and effective practices by healthcare professionals.


This study investigates the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pharmacogenomics among physicians and pharmacists in Lahore. A cross-sectional survey, conducted in 2024, employed a validated self-administered questionnaire based on published literature. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and t-tests to compare the responses.


Out of 374 participants, equally divided between physicians and pharmacists, differences in knowledge were observed, yet both groups exhibited positive attitudes and interest in pharmacogenomics practices. The study highlights the need to bolster pharmacogenomics education in Lahore’s medical curricula and to provide specialized learning resources for clinicians and pharmacists. Both groups demonstrated a strong interest in increasing their pharmacogenomics knowledge.

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