EXPLORING THE ANTI-ARTHRITIC PROPERTIES OF ALKALOID-RICH EXTRACT FROM T. UMBELLIFERUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR GOUT-INDUCED ARTHRITIS MANAGEMENT

Main Article Content

Bashir Ahmad
Khalil Ahmad
Hafiz Muhammad Asif
Ghazala Shaheen
Rabia Zahid
Uzma Bashir

Keywords

Tanacteum umbelliferum, Alkaloid, Arthritis, Denaturation, Hyperuricemia

Abstract

This study explores the anti-arthritic properties of the alkaloid-rich extract from Tanacteum umbelliferum in gout, a form of arthritis characterized by urate crystal accumulation in joints. Chronic hyperuricemia and gout can lead to severe joint pain, swelling, and damage. Through meticulous investigation using the protein denaturation method, the study evaluates the influence of T. umbelliferum alkaloid-rich extract on preventing protein denaturation, a key factor in arthritis development. The extract shows notable efficacy in countering protein denaturation, with lower IC50 values indicating heightened anti-arthritic activity. The findings suggest that T. umbelliferum extract may serve as an optimistic anti-arthritic agent, potentially mitigating the progression and symptoms of gout-induced arthritis. These results contribute to understanding the mechanisms underlying arthritis pathogenesis and offer insights into the therapeutic potential of natural alkaloid-rich extracts in arthritis management.

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