A CATHRANTHUS ROSEUS: AN ASSESSMENT OF ITS BOTANY, CONVENTIONAL UTILIZATION, PHYTOCHEMISTRY & PHARMACOLOGY

Main Article Content

Swati Trivedi
Ruchi Jaiswal
Vikram Kumar Sahu
Anubhav Dubey
Sribatsa Lanchhana Dash
Amit Mishra

Keywords

Catharanthus roseus, phytochemicals, vincristine, vinblastine

Abstract

Ayurveda is the Indian traditional system of medicine which focuses on the medical potential of plants. Catharanthus roseus is one plant recognized well in Ayurveda. It is an evergreen plant first originated from islands of Madagascar. The flowers may vary in colour from pink to purple and leaves are arranged in opposite pairs. It produces nearly 130 alkaloids mainly ajmalicine, vincamine, reserpine, vincristine, vinblastine and raubasin. Vincristine and vinblastine are used for the treatment of various types of cancer such as Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, skin cancer and lymphoblastic leukemia. It is an endangered species and need to be conserved using techniques like micropropagation. It has many pharmacological properties such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-diabetic, wound healing, anti-ulcer, hypotensive, antidiarrhoeal, hypolipidemic and memory enhancement. The purpose of the current study is to document updated data about its traditional uses, isolated bioactive compounds and pharmacological activities reported.

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References

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