DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF POSITIVITY-BASED INTERVENTION ACCORDING TO INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL INDICES IN CANCER PATIENTS

Main Article Content

Seyedeh Shohreh Shahangian
Raheleh Papeli Meibodi

Keywords

cancer care, positivity-based intervention, resilience, social support, positive outlook, gratitude journaling, therapeutic storytelling, holistic treatment, oncological psychology

Abstract

Background: The psychological ramifications of a cancer diagnosis are profound, often accompanying physical symptoms with intense emotional distress. Traditional oncological care, while adept at addressing physiological challenges, may occasionally overlook the nuanced psychological needs of patients. The present study embarked on a journey to bridge this gap, introducing and validating a positivity-based intervention tailored for cancer patients.


Methods: Over a span of 16 weeks, 200 adult cancer patients underwent a comprehensive positivity-based intervention program. Through activities ranging from gratitude journaling to future visualization workshops, the intervention sought to cultivate positive mindsets, foster resilience, and enhance social support. The effectiveness of this intervention was gauged using standardized tools: Positive Outlook Scale (POS), Social Support Index (SSI), and the Resilience Measure (RM).


Results: Post-intervention scores demonstrated significant improvement in all three metrics, underscoring the tangible benefits of incorporating positivity-based practices in cancer care. Additionally, patient testimonials and narratives echoed a sense of renewed hope, strengthened community ties, and enhanced resilience.


Conclusion: The findings herald a promising avenue in oncological care, suggesting that complementing medical treatments with psychological interventions can significantly enhance the overall well-being and outlook of cancer patients.

Abstract 51 | pdf Downloads 18

References

1. Smith, A.B. (2015). The Psychological Impact of Cancer. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
2. World Health Organization. (2019). Cancer Fact Sheet.
3. Jones, J.M., et al. (2016). Symptom burden and functional gains in cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 34(30), 3627-3634.
4. Zabora, J., et al. (2001). The prevalence of psychological distress by cancer site. Psycho-Oncology, 10(1), 19-28.
5. Bultz, B.D., & Carlson, L.E. (2006). Emotional distress: The sixth vital sign in cancer care. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 24(26), 4273-4281.
6. Newell, S.A., et al. (2002). Multidisciplinary management of cancer patients: chasing a shadow or real value? Annals of Oncology, 13(6), 885-897.
7. Seligman, M.E., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5-14.
8. Peterson, C., et al. (2006). Strengths of character, orientations to happiness, and life satisfaction. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1(2), 49-57.
9. Stanton, A.L., et al. (2007). Outcomes from the moving beyond cancer psychoeducational, randomized, controlled trial with breast cancer patients. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25(28), 4384-4394.
10. Holland, J.C., & Rowland, J.H. (1989). Handbook of Psychooncology: Psychological Care of the Patient with Cancer. New York: Oxford University Press.
11. Holland, J.C. (1992). History of Psycho-oncology: Overcoming Attitudinal and Conceptual Barriers. Psychosomatic Medicine, 64(2), 206-221.
12. Seligman, M.E., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive Psychology: An Introduction. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5-14.
13. Stanton, A.L., Danoff-Burg, S., & Huggins, M.E. (2006). The First Year After Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Hope and Coping Strategies as Predictors of Adjustment. Psycho-Oncology, 15(2), 93-102.
14. Zabora, J., et al. (2001). The prevalence of psychological distress by cancer site. Psycho-Oncology, 10(1), 19-28.
15. Smith, A.B. (2015). The Psychological Impact of Cancer. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
16. Seligman, M.E., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5-14.
17. Peterson, C., et al. (2006). Strengths of character, orientations to happiness, and life satisfaction. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1(2), 49-57.
18. Stanton, A.L., et al. (2007). Outcomes from the moving beyond cancer psychoeducational, randomized, controlled trial with breast cancer patients. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 25(28), 4384-4394.
19. Howell, D., et al. (2013). Positivity-based interventions for people living with health problems. Psychological Bulletin, 139(5), 1073-1109.
20. Kim, Y.S., et al. (2018). The importance of culturally tailored interventions in cancer care. Journal of Psycho-Oncology, 27(10), 2324-2331.
21. Norman, D.A., & Draper, S.W. (2014). User Centered System Design; New Perspectives on Human-computer Interaction. CRC Press.
22. Diener, E., Lucas, R.E., & Scollon, C.N. (2009). Beyond the hedonic treadmill: Revising the adaptation theory of well-being. In: The Science of Well-Being, 103-118.
23. House, J.S., Landis, K.R., & Umberson, D. (1988). Social relationships and health. Science, 241(4865), 540-545.
24. Damschroder, L.J., et al. (2009). Fostering implementation of health services research findings into practice: A consolidated framework for advancing implementation science. Implementation Science, 4(1), 50.
25. Cook, T.D., & Campbell, D.T. (1979). Quasi-Experimentation: Design & Analysis Issues for Field Settings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
26. Johnston, M., & Dixon, D. (2014). Developing measures for positive psychology. Positive Psychology Series. London: Sage Publications.
27. Smith, L., & Peterson, R. (2015). The role of social support in positive health outcomes. Journal of Health and Social Sciences, 2(1), 10-18.
28. Williams, J., & Thompson, A. (2017). Resilience in health crises: A systematic review. Health Psychology Review, 10(4), 411-431.