INSIGHTS INTO THE ADOPTION PROCESS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY WITH ADOPTIVE PARENTS IN ETHEKWINI, KWAZULU-NATAL

Main Article Content

R Groger
R Bhagwan

Keywords

Adoption process, Adoptive parents, trans-racial, challenges, experiences, support

Abstract

This study explored the experiences of sixteen adoptive parents, in the eThekwini region, with regards to the adoption process. A qualitative research approach, with an exploratory descriptive design, was used to guide the study. Findings revealed that the primary reasons for adopting were due to infertility issues as well as personal religious reasons to adopt. Considering that the majority of adoptable children are Black, most participants had adopted trans-racially. Participants described the myriad of challenges they encountered, and emotions experienced from completing the application forms to waiting to find out if they had been matched with a child and then meeting the child for the first time. The paper also provided a lens on the experience of the formal completion of the adoption process and thus the support participants needed. Thus, enabling stakeholders, including social workers involved in the adoption process to collaborate better with adoptive parents.

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