TOWARDS IDENTIFYING A CHARACTERISTIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE FOR FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS 2. SPECIFIC CAREGIVER- AND TEACHER-RATING

Main Article Content

Sara A Stevens
Kelly Nash
Ellen Fantus
Irena Nulman
Joanne Rovet
Gideon Koren

Keywords

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, caregiver, teacher, neuropsychological tests, behavior

Abstract

Objectives


This study compares the behavioral profile of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) who were diagnosed using the Canadian Guidelines with children with prenatal alcohol exposure who did not meet criteria for a FASD diagnosis.


 


Methods and Procedures


To accomplish this, we used caregiver and teacher questionnaires evaluating different aspects of behavior. Investigated were 170 children, 109 who received a diagnosis of FASD (Diagnosed Group) and 61 who did not (Non-Diagnosed Group). On the caregiver report, children in the Diagnosed Group had more internalizing and externalizing problems on the CBCL, more executive function difficulties on the BRIEF and more attention problems on the Conner’s Rating Scale, compared to the Non-Diagnosed Group. On teacher report, children in the Diagnosed Group had more internalizing and externalizing problems on the TRF and more attention problems on the Conner’s Rating Scale, compared to the Non-Diagnosed Group. For both informants, more children in the Diagnosed group had scores in the clinically elevated range.


 


Conclusion


Overall, the present results identify key caregiver- and teacher-rated profiles of children with FASD diagnoses. These profiles will aid in better understanding, diagnosing and providing focused treatment approaches for children with FASD.

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