The Preoperative Administration of Nebulized Dexmedetomidine Versus Nebulized Midazolam as a Sedative Premedication before Pediatric Surgery

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Amira Aboelnasr Awad
Manal Foad Abdelmoniem
Rasha Lotfy El Saied
Amira Ibrahim lashin
Noha Mohamed Abdelwahab
Abeer Shaban Goda

Keywords

Children, Nebulization, Dexmedetomidine , Midazolam, Pediatric surgeries

Abstract

Children usually anxious and fearful at time of hospitalization and surgery making the induction period difficult . This research compare the premedication of nebulized dexmedetomidine and nebulized midazolam as sedative drugs used before surgery in children.
Methods: Ninety children younger than 12 years old participated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized research in which they were pre-medicated with either 2 µg/kg of nebulized dexmedetomidine (group D) or 0.2 mg/kg of nebulized midazolam (group M) . The hemodynamic parameters, the sedation scores, the parental separation anxiety scores, the mask acceptance scores, and the ease of the venipuncture for the cannulation are recorded.
Results: Although the onset of sedation was started early in M group children , D group children were more sedated and had a higher percentage of children with a high score for parental separation and who were willing to accept an anesthetic mask. Intravenous cannulation score was comparable between both groups.
Conclusion: Nebulization with dexmedetomidine produced more satisfactory sedation , easy parental separation and face mask acceptance nebulization than those who received nebulised midazolam.

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